Facebook Pixel

Medical Travel Made Simple

Compare clinics and arrange your medical trip

Receive top healthcare services

Visit amazing places

Best prices guaranteed!

Dental Implants in Poland

Compare 5 clinics

Dental implants, also known as endosseous implants are used in order to provide a stable platform and support for a dental prosthesis

Read More
Contact Clinic

INDEXMEDICA Dental Clinic

Krakow, Poland
ISO 9001:2008 - International Organization for Standardization
FROM€ 549
Contact Clinic

Implant-Art Dental Clinic

Warsaw, Poland
4 reviews
FROM€ 657
Contact Clinic

Clinica del Mare

Gdynia, Poland
FROM€ 765
Contact Clinic

Dentus

Szczecin, Poland
11 reviews
ICOI - International Congress of Oral Implantologists
FROM€ 800
Contact Clinic

KCM Clinic

Jelenia Góra, Poland
1 review
TÜV SÜD - Technical Control Unit ISO 9001:2008 - International Organization for Standardization IFSO - International Federation for the Surgery of Obesity and Metabolic Disorders
Please enquire
Average Ratings:  
16 reviews

Dental Implants Cost in Poland

Cheapest Dental Implants price in Poland is € 549. Average Dental Implants cost in Poland is € 693 where prices can go as high as € 800.

With FlyMedi, you can connect with 5 Dentistry centers in Poland that are offering Dental Implants procedures. These Dentistry centers are accredited by international standard-setting bodies including ISO 9001:2008 and ICOI. Popular Dental Implants destinations in Poland include Warsaw, Szczecin and Gdynia.

Prices listed on this page are the average price for Dental Implants. Clinics may require more details regarding your medical condition in order to provide you with a personalized Dental Implants quote. For a more accurate Dental Implants price quote, please click HERE.

Poland

Poland or the Republic of Poland is located in Central Europe. It neighbours Germany, The Czech Republic, Slovakia, Ukraine, Belarus, Russia and Lithuania.

Poland’s countryside is traditional and unspoiled. Tourists can visit museums, churches, rural centres, castles and traditional Polish workshops. Since Poland joined the European Union there was an influx of international travellers coming into the country and discovering its rich cultural, natural and gastronomic heritage. Travellers can indulge in history, architecture, different types of food and nature.

Healthcare

Poland has a reliable state-funded healthcare system. Generally, doctors in Poland are extremely well trained. Soon after Poland entered the European Union, the private healthcare sector thrived and more private clinics and hospitals were opened.

Poland also has plenty of medical universities and university hospitals: The Medical University of Bialystok, The Medical University of Warsaw, The Medical University of Poznan and many others.

Many tourists visit Poland solely for medical care, with dental care and plastic surgery being the preferred choice. Most patients come from the Scandinavian countries, Germany and Belarus but patients from the United Kingdom and United States are also quite common.

Some of the most important cities in Poland are:

Warsaw – The capital of Poland and a thriving business centre
Gdansk – Formerly known as Danzig
Cracow – The Cultural Capital of Poland
Poznan – It is considered to be the birthplace of the Polish nation

Sights to See

Cracow is the Cultural Capital of Poland. It’s also Poland’s historical capital in the middle ages. The old town of Cracow is filled with monuments, churches and traditional Polish buildings. Cracow is also the home to Europe’s largest medieval market place. Cracow’s old town is an UNESCO World Heritage Site.

The Bialowieza National Park is an UNESCO World Heritage Site – it’s a huge area of woodland on the border with Belarus.

Malbork Castle is the biggest red brick Gothic castle in Europe. This is also an UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Slowinski National Park is the home to the biggest dunes in Europe. It’s also very close to the Baltic Sea so a trip is well worth it.

The Wieliczka Salt Mine is the oldest enterprise in the world and one of the most beautiful places in Poland. The salt mine has been operational since the 13th century and it has its own Church built entirely out of salt. The salt statues built by the miners themselves are also worth seeing.

Things to Know

● Poland has a temperate climate mostly. Summers are generally quite warm and delightful while winters are rather cold. Polish winters are generally dry and precipitations are a bit rarer than in the summer months.

● Poland’s main airport is Warsaw International Airport (WAW). Tourists can find direct flights to almost any European capital. Intercontinental flights to the US or China are also quite common.

● The official language in Poland is Polish but English, German and French are also popular languages, especially among younger individuals.

● Poland uses the Zloty (PLN) as currency. One Euro is roughly 4.2 PLNs. Tourists are advised not to use the currency exchanges in airports or hotels.

● Poland uses the 230V, 50Hz electrical system fitted with European style plugs but it’s not uncommon to find adapters for British or American style plugs.

Read More Show Less

Dental Implants

Dental implants, also known as endosseous implants are used in order to provide a stable platform and support for a dental prosthesis such as a denture, bridge or crown. Implants are usually used as a platform to support dental crowns. Dental implants are made out of titanium and zirconia with the latter being in use for a shorter period of time – titanium dental implants have been the norm due to the metal’s durability and biocompatibility. Advances in the field of implantology made dental implant problems a very rare occurrence – reliability of the implant itself and the fact that it’s a very safe procedure are just a few factors that make it such a popular choice for dentists as well as patients.

Dental Implants Candidates

Dental implant surgery is recommended for individuals with missing teeth or patients who need dentures.

Am I Suitable for Dental Implants?

A dental implant procedure is not recommended for individuals that suffer from jaw bone loss, diabetes, a suppressed immune system, individuals that had radiation therapy on the head or neck or individuals that had a heart attack recently. Pregnant women should avoid having dental implant surgery – it’s best to wait a bit.

Preparing for Dental Implants

It’s usually a good idea for the patient to have a set of dental x-rays before leaving for dental implants overseas.

How is Dental Implants Performed?

A dental implant process can be divided into two sections and two sessions with the dentist:

During the first session of a dental implant procedure, the dentist will create an incision into the gum, in the area where the implant will be placed. The gum tissue is then pushed back in order to expose the bone – this is where the actual implant will be placed. A small hole will be drilled and the dentist will proceed to screw the titanium or zirconia implant in. Once the implant is placed, the abutment can be put in place over the implant. A temporary dental crown is then placed over the abutment.

During the second session of the implant surgery, the dentist will remove the temporary crown and place the permanent dental crown or bridge. Dental implant pain is practically non-existent as anaesthesia is administered to the patient before the procedure begins. The average dental implant recovery time is around 2 months – this is the time it takes for the bone to completely heal and tighten the implant in place.

A dental implant abutment can be made from either titanium or zirconia, depending on where the implant is placed.

Dental Implants Summary

Anesthesia

Local anesthetic

Minimum Stay

2 to 3 days

Duration of Operation

Around 45 minutes

Number of Trips Abroad

Usually patients need to travel twice, with a 2 to 6 months break in between

Dental Implants Risks and Complications

Dental implant complications can include: 
● Dental implant failure (the fracture implant abutment screw, implant or both) 
● Infection of the area - easily treatable with antibiotics 
● Blood vessels, tissue and teeth structures around the implant can be damaged 
● The implant can push into a sinus cavity (upper jaw implants only) 
It’s worthy to note that dental implant complications are few and far between. Implant fractures are at 0.14%. Crown fractures are at 4.5%.

Dental Implants Side Effects

Dental implant surgery side effects can include swelling, slight bleeding, discomfort and pain which can be soothed with painkillers.

Dental Implants Success Rates

Dental implants are one-time investment, as they usually last a lifetime. Dental implant patient reviews report a 96.8% success rate.

Before and After Dental Implants

Dental implants are practically indistinguishable from natural teeth. When a ceramic crown is used, the material will reflect light in the same way as a real tooth would do. Patients can request dental implant pictures from clinics before visiting them for treatment.

Dental Implants FAQ

- Will it hurt?
You won’t feel a thing – the surgeon will administer anaesthesia before beginning to plant the dental implant. Some patients may feel mild discomfort but that is comparable to a regular filling procedure.

- What is the best dental implant abutment type?
This depends, dental implant abutments can be made out of titanium, gold, surgical stainless steel or zirconia, with the latter being a relatively newer material choice. While zirconia is more aesthetically pleasing, it is not as durable as titanium for example and a good dentist would recommend a titanium abutment for teeth subjected to high amounts of pressure – the molars for example.

- Dental Implant vs Bridge – What is better?
If the patient has enough jaw bone tissue to support an implant, it’s definitely the better choice. If there is not enough tissue, the patient may opt for a dental implant bone graft or a dental bridge. Dental bridges will need to be replaced every 10-15 years but dental implants last a lifetime.

Dental Implant Types – Which is Better?

For decades, the norm in dental implant materials has been titanium. With newer technological developments in the field of dentistry, different materials have started to be used for the manufacture of dental implants. These materials have been subjected to thorough research related to their chemical and physical properties before clinical applications. Ideally, dental implant materials need to be biocompatible and strong enough to resist huge amounts of pressure exerted when chewing or biting. They also need to be highly resistant to fracturing or corrosion. Titanium and zirconium dental implants are the most popular choices today for regular dental implants since these materials offer great strength and biocompatibility. 

Titanium Dental Implants

These implants are made from a metal called titanium, which is the most common material used for implants as well as other prosthetics in the medical field. The biggest advantage titanium has over other materials is its biocompatibility – the bone surrounding titanium implants will continue to grow and create a permanent bond. Given its prevalence in dentistry and the medical field, titanium is also more affordable than other options.

Zirconia Dental Implants

Dental implants produced from zirconia are a relatively recent invention, becoming widely available in the 1990s. Although these implants are still relatively new, they are becoming more popular due to their aesthetics.

Titanium VS Zirconia Dental Implants

Both zirconia and titanium dental implants have different characteristics and advantages. For example, titanium has been the norm in dentistry for over 30 years, meaning that it has been thoroughly tested by millions of patients. During this time it has proven to offer high success rates both in dentistry as well as in other medical fields. Being so versatile made it virtually indispensible to the medical field. Let’s look at a few advantages titanium has over zirconia dental implants.

  • Titanium dental implants are made up of two separate components – the implant which will eventually fuse with the bone and an abutment which is screwed on top of the implant. On the other hand, zirconia dental implants are produced from only one single piece.
  • Titanium is fully biocompatible, meaning that it’s able to naturally fuse to bone over time, making it even more durable. Zirconia cannot fuse to bone.
  • Given that titanium dental implants are produced from two pieces, it’s possible to provide customizable implant solutions for patients with bone loss or with bone deficiency. 
  • Zirconia-based dental implants can form micro-cracks when adjusted. These micro-cracks can later cause fractures in the implant itself. This is due to the fact that zirconia is not as flexible as other materials such as titanium.
  • Zirconia dental implant crowns are usually cemented in place, instead of being screwed in place as it’s the case with titanium. Dental cement can have a detrimental effect on the tissue and bone surrounding the implant. 

 

This content is written and reviewed by our medical content team in January, 2019.